October 2021 Conservancy Newsletter

Upper Truckee River

October 2021 Conservancy Newsletter

After the fires and a record-breaking hot, dry summer, October has brought welcome rain and snow. Better news still, the Caldor Fire is now 100 percent contained. Here in the Lake Tahoe Basin, much work has already been done to repair public lands, including the Conservancy’s properties, that were affected by the Caldor Fire.

We celebrate the major investments in forest and climate resilience this past month from the State of California and the federal government. Governor Newsom signed funding packages that will send $41 million to the Conservancy to support work to restore forest health, reduce wildfire risk, and make Tahoe more resilient to climate change. Soon after, Interior Secretary Deb Haaland approved $48 million in federal funds to support Basin projects that will reduce hazardous fuels and wildfire risk.

There remains much to do. Despite the wet month, the drought that is worsening wildfires is now a statewide emergency. But the Tahoe community has shown it can handle adversity and still thrive. We remain optimistic and look forward to working with you to protect and restore the national treasure that is the Lake Tahoe Basin.

Jane Freeman, Acting Executive Director
California Tahoe Conservancy

Helping Conservancy Lands Recover from the Caldor Fire

Upper Truckee River

Helping Conservancy Lands Recover from the Caldor Fire

In September, the Incident Management Team for the Caldor Fire began repairing the fire-suppression control lines created around by neighborhoods by dozers and hand crews. Their work helps minimize potential soil erosion and other impacts. At the same time, Conservancy staff assessed damage to Conservancy lands from the fire and suppression efforts. The good news is that the fire itself largely spared Conservancy lands, and control lines only affected 31 Conservancy properties which required recovery work.

post-Caldor assessment
Conservancy Staff Team Inspecting Caldor-Affected Properties

In the weeks that followed, Conservancy staff and the Tahoe Resource Conservation District’s restoration crews began stabilizing soil and taking other actions on the affected Conservancy properties to help them recover in the months and years ahead.

post-Caldor recoveryConservancy staff and Tahoe Resource Conservation District crews stabilize Conservancy land after the Caldor Fire.

post-Caldor recovery

The Role of Forest Thinning and Fuels Reduction in Fighting the Caldor Fire

In the weeks since the Caldor Fire came under control, the USDA Forest Service and other partner agencies have produced videos exploring how work by land managers to thin forests and reduce flammable fuels helped firefighters fight the Caldor Fire and protect communities.

Tahoe Regional Transportation Agency Awards $11 million for Sustainable Transportation Projects

Greenway shared-use path

The Tahoe Regional Planning Agency (TRPA) has awarded funding to seven transportation projects across the Tahoe region that will reduce congestion, expand regional trails, provide free transit, support sustainable recreation and tourism, assist with Caldor Fire recovery work, improve lake clarity, and create climate resiliency. The new funding includes $500,000 to El Dorado County for a future phase of the South Tahoe Greenway Shared Use Trail. Learn more.

Newly Released: Draft 2021 California Climate Adaptation Strategy

Newly Released: Draft 2021 California Climate Adaptation Strategy

California is taking action to combat climate change and build resilience with the release of the draft 2021 California Climate Adaptation Strategy. The strategy builds on the successes and lessons learned since the first climate adaptation strategy in 2009 and is designed to accelerate climate adaptation action across regions and sectors in California. The Conservancy is proud to be a part of how the State is working together to identify how key state agency actions fit together to achieve these priorities.

Learn more about the draft strategy and how you can provide input.

Conservancy Staff Updates

New Employees

Daniel Huerta

Daniel Huerta

Environmental Planner

Daniel joined the Conservancy as an Environmental Planner in August. He is working in the Tahoe Livable Communities Program, assisting with the Land Bank Program and other projects. Prior to joining the Conservancy, Daniel worked for the City of Vacaville as a Housing Administrator, working on affordable housing development projects and running housing programs in the Housing Services Department. He has a Bachelor of Science from the University of California, Davis in Community and Regional Development, minoring in Environmental Policy Analysis and Planning, and earned a master’s degree in Urban and Regional Planning from the University of California, Irvine.

Promotions

Milan Yeates

Milan Yeates

Community Forestry Program Supervisor

Milan Yeates has accepted the position as the Conservancy’s Community Forestry Program Supervisor. In this role, Milan oversees the Conservancy’s work to reduce wildfire risk and restore forest health within the communities of the California side of the Lake Tahoe Basin, including on the Conservancy’s thousands of neighborhood lots. He will continue to work extensively with the Tahoe Fire and Fuels Team (TFFT) to coordinate forest management efforts. He also plays a key role in implementing the strategies in the Lake Tahoe Basin Forest Action Plan. A Registered Professional Forester, Milan has been a part of the Conservancy’s forestry team for over 15 years and brings a wealth of history and knowledge.

Upcoming California Tahoe Conservancy Board Meetings

The California Tahoe Conservancy Board will meet on November 8, 2021. An agenda will be available on the Conservancy website ten days prior to the meeting.

Show Your Love for Tahoe While Protecting It

When you order a California Lake Tahoe license plate, you help build biking and hiking trails, restore fish and wildlife habitat, and protect Lake Tahoe’s famous beaches and blue waters. 96 percent of all funds from Tahoe plate sales come back to Lake Tahoe. 

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Show Your Love for Tahoe While Protecting It

When you order a California Lake Tahoe license plate, you help build biking and hiking trails, restore fish and wildlife habitat, and protect Lake Tahoe’s famous beaches and blue waters. 96 percent of all funds from Tahoe plate sales come back to Lake Tahoe.