Historic Tahoe Conservancy Acquisition Will Protect Upper Truckee River, Marsh, and Lake Tahoe

State and Tahoe Partners Celebrate Opportunity to Acquire Environmentally Sensitive Land to Protect Habitat and Water Quality and Restore the River and Floodplain

Managing Conservancy Lands

The California Tahoe Conservancy manages 4,700 state properties as part of its mission to lead California’s efforts to restore and enhance the extraordinary natural and recreational resources of the Lake Tahoe Basin.

Signature Projects

Blackwood Creek

Dennis T. Machida Memorial Greenway

The Dennis T. Machida Memorial Greenway provides the backbone of the shared-use trail network in the south shore.

Blackwood Creek

Tahoe Pines Restoration

The Conservancy is restoring the 8.1-acre site of the former Tahoe Pines campground and building an accessible new trail to the Upper Truckee River.

Blackwood Creek

Lower Blackwood Creek Restoration

Blackwood Creek is also an important fishery; historically it supported Lahontan Cutthroat Trout and other native species.

Eagle Rock

Eagle Rock

The summit of Eagle Rock can now be reached in approximately 20 minutes using the new trail.

Van Sickle Bi-State Park

Van Sickle Bi-State Park

Van Sickle Bi-State Park represents a long held vision and partnership between the states of California and Nevada.

People visiting Lake Tahoe at Carnelian Bay

Carnelian Bay Lake Access East

One of the strengths of the Conservancy lies in its ability to accomplish multiple resource restoration and public access objectives.

Upper Truckee Marsh

Upper Truckee Marsh Restoration

The California Tahoe Conservancy plans to restore the complex and unique ecology of the Upper Truckee Marsh.

California Tahoe Conservancy Lands

The Conservancy manages thousands of properties in the Lake Tahoe Basin for public access and recreation, environmental conservation, and wildlife protection. Many parcels are smaller than a third of an acre and are scattered throughout neighborhoods. Learn more about Conservancy land management.

View a full-screen map of Conservancy lands. 

State properties managed by the Conservancy at Lake Tahoe

Acres of habitat, open space and recreation

California Tahoe Conservancy Lands

The Conservancy manages thousands of properties in the Lake Tahoe Basin for public access and recreation, environmental conservation, and wildlife protection. Many parcels are smaller than a third of an acre and are scattered throughout neighborhoods. Learn more about Conservancy land management.

View a full-screen map of Conservancy lands. 

State properties managed by the Conservancy at Lake Tahoe

Acres of habitat, open space and recreation

Land Acknowledgement

DaɁaw (Lake Tahoe) is the homeland of the waší∙šiw (Washoe people – the people from here). The waší∙šiw are the aboriginal stewards of the land in and around the Lake Tahoe Basin since the beginning of time and as a sovereign nation the Washoe Tribe of Nevada and California, as it is known today, continues to advocate for the protection and preservation of waší∙šiw ɁítdeɁ (the Washoe peoples homelands). The waší∙šiw relied on the land for survival; hunting, fishing, and gathering of traditional foods and medicines within their homelands was an integral part of the wá∙šiw (Washoe) culture and through this intrinsic relationship they helped shape the natural beauty of the Lake Tahoe Basin that so many enjoy today. As colonizers arrived in mass in the Comstock during the gold rush era, the wá∙šiw summer camps became prime locations for logging and cattle grazing and the waší∙šiw were no longer allowed to manage their lands as they had done for millenniums. The removal of wá∙šiw people from the land and increase in tourism to the Lake Tahoe Basin has negatively impacted an area that is not only renowned for its natural beauty and pristine waters but is now in dire need of rehabilitation. The Washoe Tribe of Nevada and California has maintained their role as environmental stewards of the Lake Tahoe Basin (despite policies that sought to eradicate them) by continuing to advocate for their homelands and to protect, respect, and take care of waší∙šiw ɁítdeɁ. As we acknowledge the Lake Tahoe Basin as the homeland of the waší∙šiw, we ask that you, as visitors to these lands, treat this place with the same respect as those who walked before you, the waší∙šiw.

flowers and mountains at sunset

Recent Updates

The aurora and the moon shine on Lake Tahoe in May 2024.

May has delivered extraordinary natural events for the Sierra, with a major snowstorm to start the month and the spectacle of the aurora shining over Lake Tahoe. For the Conservancy,...

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SHOW YOUR LOVE FOR TAHOE WHILE PROTECTING IT.

Help protect Lake Tahoe’s clear blue waters, mountain forests, and world-class recreation by ordering your Tahoe Plate today.

Mountain biker holding Lake Tahoe license plate

SHOW YOUR LOVE FOR TAHOE WHILE PROTECTING IT.

Help protect Lake Tahoe’s clear blue waters, mountain forests, and world-class recreation by ordering your Tahoe Plate today.

Mountain biker holding Lake Tahoe license plate
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Wade Crowfoot

Secretary for Natural Resources

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